NCC 24 – Why was it Necessary for Christ, the Redeemer, to Die?

Question

Why was it necessary for Christ, the Redeemer, to die?

Full Answer

Since death is the punishment for sin, Christ died willingly in our place to deliver us from the power and penalty of sin and bring us back to God. By his substitutionary atoning death, he alone redeems us from hell and gains for us forgiveness of sin, righteousness, and everlasting life.

Short Answer

Christ died willingly in our place to deliver us from the power and penalty of sin and bring us back to God.

Primary Scripture

And you, who once were alienated and hostile in mind, doing evil deeds, he has now reconciled in his body of flesh by his death, in order to present you holy and blameless and above reproach before him. (Colossians 1:21-22)

Commentary

Christ lived a perfect life, the life you and I should have lived. He lived a life of love, of service. He lived an amazing life of trust in his heavenly Father. So the question is a pressing one. Why should one like that die? Why was it morally necessary? Well, he didn’t have to die for his own sake. If we were thinking just about Jesus, there would be no necessity for the cross. No, he died because he would be the Redeemer. It was his will, and also his heavenly Father’s will, to redeem us. It was his will to lay down his life, to sacrifice himself by dying on the cross in order to rescue us from the penalty that we deserved. You see, because God is good, he will punish sin. That wrong thing that you or I have done in secret—God knows about it. God’s real. He’s not just an idea. He’s not just a figment of our imagination. And this God is so thoroughly committed to what is good and right that every sin will be punished. And this is where Jesus comes in. Jesus determined to be our Redeemer. It was the will of his heavenly Father that he give himself as a sacrifice in substitution. That’s a word that’s often used—as a substitute, in the place of, instead of you and me. Jesus is our substitute if we repent of our sins, turn from them and trust in him. So why did the Redeemer need to die? Because that’s the only way you and I would live. (Taken from New City Catechism commentary by Mark Dever, available at http://newcitycatechism.com/new-city-catechism/#24)

Additional Scripture References

  • Romans 8:3. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh.
  • Hebrews 2:9. But we see him who for a little while was made lower than the angels, namely Jesus, crowned with glory and honor because of the suffering of death, so that by the grace of God he might taste death for everyone.
  • Hebrews 2:14-15. Since therefore the children share in flesh and blood, he himself likewise partook of the same things, that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil, and deliver all those who through fear of death were subject to lifelong slavery.

Resources:Catechism Anchor

Teaching Ideas:

  • Read Scripture. Read one or two Scripture passages each day.
  • Create a Flashcard. Write the question on one side of an index card and the answer on the other. Also write the Scripture reference on one side of another index card and the Scripture on the other side. Use these as flash cards throughout the week.
  • Memorize the Question and Answer. Write the question and answer on a whiteboard or piece of paper. Each day erase three or four words and put blanks in their place. Read the question and answer replacing the blanks with the correct missing words.
  • Read the Commentary. Available on the NCC website or App.
  • Listen to a Song. Listen or read the lyrics to I Will Glorify in My Redeemer.
  • Review Past Catechism Answers. Discuss how question 20-24 connect with each other. Discuss how all the previous questions lead us to think about and believe in the redeemer.

Discussion Questions

  • What evidence do we have that Jesus died on the cross?
  • Why is sin so serious that it must be punished by death?
  • How can we pray and live to show our gratitude to God for providing a Redeemer?

 

All Scriptures: The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. 2001.
Standard Bible Society: Wheaton.

NCC 23 – Why must the Redeemer be truly God?

Question

Why must the Redeemer be truly God?

Full Answer

That because of his divine nature his obedience and suffering would be perfect and effective; and also that he would be able to bear the righteous anger of God against sin and yet overcome death.

Short Answer

That because of his divine nature his obedience and suffering would be perfect and effective.

Primary Scripture

God raised him up, loosing the pangs of death, because it was not possible for him to be held by it. (Acts 2:24)

 

Additional Scripture References

  • Isaiah 9:6. For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
  • Romans 1:4. And was declared to be the Son of God in power according to the Spirit of holiness by his resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord.
  • Romans 3:24-26. and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus, whom God put forward as a propitiation by his blood, to be received by faith. This was to show God’s righteousness, because in his divine forbearance he had passed over former sins. It was to show his righteousness at the present time, so that he might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.
  • Romans 4:25. Who was delivered up for our trespasses and raised for our justification.
  • 2 Corinthians 5:21. For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.
  • Titus 2:13-14. waiting for our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us to redeem us from all lawlessness and to purify for himself a people for his own possession who are zealous for good works.
  • Hebrews 5:8-9. Although he was a son, he learned obedience through what he suffered. And being made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation to all who obey him.
  • Hebrews 7:25-28. Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them. For it was indeed fitting that we should have such a high priest, holy, innocent, unstained, separated from sinners, and exalted above the heavens. He has no need, like those high priests, to offer sacrifices daily, first for his own sins and then for those of the people, since he did this once for all when he offered up himself. For the law appoints men in their weakness as high priests, but the word of the oath, which came later than the law, appoints a Son who has been made perfect forever.
  • Hebrews 9:11-15. But when Christ appeared as a high priest of the good things that have come, then through the greater and more perfect tent (not made with hands, that is, not of this creation) he entered once for all into the holy places, not by means of the blood of goats and calves but by means of his own blood, thus securing an eternal redemption. For if the blood of goats and bulls, and the sprinkling of defiled persons with the ashes of a heifer, sanctify for the purification of the flesh, how much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God. Therefore he is the mediator of a new covenant, so that those who are called may receive the promised eternal inheritance, since a death has occurred that redeems them from the transgressions committed under the first covenant.

Resources:Catechism Anchor

Teaching Ideas:

  • Read Scripture. Read one or two Scripture passages each day.
  • Create a Flashcard. Write the question on one side of an index card and the answer on the other. Also write the Scripture reference on one side of another index card and the Scripture on the other side. Use these as flash cards throughout the week.
  • Memorize the Question and Answer. Write the question and answer on a whiteboard or piece of paper. Each day erase three or four words and put blanks in their place. Read the question and answer replacing the blanks with the correct missing words.
  • Read the Commentary. Available on the NCC website or App.
  • Listen to a Song. Listen or read the lyrics to Jesus Messiah.
  • Review Past Catechism Answers. Discuss how question 20-23 connect with each other. Discuss how all the previous questions lead us to think about and believe in the redeemer.

Discussion Questions

  • Why did Jesus have to be fully God?
    Why must God be the one who saves?
    Why is man unable to pay the full penalty of sin?

 

All Scriptures: The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. 2001.
Standard Bible Society: Wheaton.

NCC 22 – Why Must the Redeemer be Truly Human?

Question

Why must the Redeemer be truly human?

Full Answer

That in human nature he might on our behalf perfectly obey the whole law and suffer the punishment for human sin; and also that he might sympathize with our weaknesses.

Short Answer

That in human nature he might on our behalf perfectly obey the whole law and suffer the punishment for human sin.

Primary Scripture

Therefore he had to be made like his brothers in every respect, so that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in the service of God, to make propitiation for the sins of the people. (Hebrews 2:17)

 

Additional Scripture References

  • Romans 5:19. For as by the one man’s disobedience the many were made sinners, so by the one man’s obedience the many will be made righteous.
  • 1 Corinthians 15:21. For as by a man came death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead.
  • Galatians 4:4-5. But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.
  • Philippians 2:8. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.
  • Hebrews 2:14-16. Since therefore the children share in flesh and blood, he himself likewise partook of the same things, that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil, and deliver all those who through fear of death were subject to lifelong slavery. For surely it is not angels that he helps, but he helps the offspring of Abraham.
  • Hebrews 4:15. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin.
  • Hebrews 7:24-26. But he holds his priesthood permanently, because he continues forever. Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them. For it was indeed fitting that we should have such a high priest, holy, innocent, unstained, separated from sinners, and exalted above the heavens.
  • 1 Peter 3:18. For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh but made alive in the spirit. .

Resources:Catechism Anchor

Teaching Ideas:

  • Read Scripture. Read one or two Scripture passages each day.
  • Create a Flashcard. Write the question on one side of an index card and the answer on the other. Also write the Scripture reference on one side of another index card and the Scripture on the other side. Use these as flash cards throughout the week.
  • Memorize the Question and Answer. Write the question and answer on a whiteboard or piece of paper. Each day erase three or four words and put blanks in their place. Read the question and answer replacing the blanks with the correct missing words.
  • Read the Commentary. Available on the NCC website or App.
  • Listen to a Song. Listen or read the lyrics to Jesus Messiah.
  • Review Past Catechism Answers. Discuss how question 20-22 connect with each other. Discuss how all the previous questions lead us to think about and believe in the redeemer.

Discussion Questions

  • How can it help us when we are tempted to know that Jesus was fully human?
  • Why did Jesus had to become fully human?
  • How can this week’s question and answer make us grateful to God? Spend some time praising God for Jesus Christ.

 

All Scriptures: The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. 2001.
Standard Bible Society: Wheaton.

NCC 21 – What Sort of Redeemer is Needed to Bring Us Back to God?

Question

What sort of Redeemer is needed to bring us back to God?

Full Answer

One who is truly human and also truly God.

Short Answer

One who is truly human and also truly God.

Primary Scripture

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. (Isaiah 9:6)

Commentary

Why do we need a Redeemer who is truly human? One reason is so that he can identify with us. The Bible says he was “in every respect . . . tempted as we are, yet without sin” (Heb. 4:15). He went through our experience, so he understands what we go through . . . We understand that God can identify with us, but even as he identified with us . . . he did it with perfect obedience, not doubting the love of his Father and not wavering from his Father’s path. Because Jesus lived a perfect life, when he willingly suffered the penalty for my sin on the cross, it was a right, adequate, and perfect substitute for my sin and for your sin. Jesus could identify with what we go through, but because he lived perfectly in obedience, he became the perfect substitute for our sin . . . But he’s also God. And because Jesus is God, he can accomplish the purposes for which he came . . . Jesus accomplishes God’s purposes in our lives. He is the God who accomplishes all that we need, even as he is the man who understands all that we need and provides all that we need. Jesus, perfect God, perfect man, is the Redeemer that we needed, and he accomplished all that was necessary by identifying with our humanity and doing what God had to do to save us. (Adapted from New City Catechism commentary by Bryan Chapell, available at http://newcitycatechism.com/new-city-catechism/#21).

Additional Scripture References

  • Matthew 1:21, 23. She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins…Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his name Immanuel” (which means, God with us).
  • Matthew 3:17. And behold, a voice from heaven said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.”
  • Hebrews 9:14. How much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God.
  • 1 Peter 2:6. For it stands in Scripture: “Behold, I am laying in Zion a stone, a cornerstone chosen and precious, and whoever believes in him will not be put to shame.”

Resources:Catechism Anchor

Teaching Ideas:

  • Read Scripture. Read one or two Scripture passages each day.
  • Create a Flashcard. Write the question on one side of an index card and the answer on the other. Also write the Scripture reference on one side of another index card and the Scripture on the other side. Use these as flash cards throughout the week.
  • Memorize the Question and Answer. Write the question and answer on a whiteboard or piece of paper. Each day erase three or four words and put blanks in their place. Read the question and answer replacing the blanks with the correct missing words.
  • Read the Commentary. Available on the NCC website or App.
  • Listen to a Song. Listen or read the lyrics to Come Behold the Wondrous Mystery.

Discussion Questions

  • How does Jesus being human help us as we struggle in life?
  • What does it mean to know Jesus took on a human nature?
  • Why was it necessary that Jesus was only truly God?

 

All Scriptures: The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. 2001.
Standard Bible Society: Wheaton.

Parent Feed (May 23, 2018)

Welcome to the first Parent Feed article. A news feed is defined by the Business Dictionary as “A continuous transmission of data, consisting of news updates, to web sites through a syndicated news service provider.” In Parent Feed the news service provider is me and the data is resources and information for parents. My goal is to share a list of sources each month I believe will help parents and those concerned about kids and teenagers. There are three criteria for including content into Parent Feed.

  1. Social. Resources that open up a window into the culture kids and teenagers live in every day.
  2. Physical. Resources to inform parents and adults of the biology, physiology, and psychology of kids and teenagers. In other words, help in understanding what is going on inside of kids and teens.
  3. Spiritual. Resources to equip parents and adults to pass faith down to the next generation.

Many resources will be a combination of two or three categories, but each will address at least one of these categories. If you come across a helpful article or resource to share, please feel free to share in the comments.

 

Engaging Whole Hearts While Forming Young Minds. [Audio]

In this podcast, Melanie Lacy shares some great thoughts on the importance of developing a Biblical worldview in the minds of our children and teenagers.

The Kids of Today.  [Audio]

Recent research suggests that teenagers are more prone to depression and poor mental health than before. In this podcast, Dr. Jean Twenge discusses her research on teens and the rise of smart phones, while Dr. John Protzko discusses delayed gratification and almost 60 years of the marshmallow test.

A Lesson in Apologetics with Sean McDowell. [Audio]

Sean McDowell is the son of apologist Josh McDowell and leads the Bible department at Capistrano Valley Christian Schools in California. In the first half of this podcast episode, Dr. McDowell discusses how to handle the tough questions of faith kids ask and offers a few answers of his own.

The Sneaky Science Behind Your Kid’s Tech Obsessions. [Article]

Common Sense Media is a non-religious website dedicated to informing and empowering parents to “harness the power of media and technology as a positive force in all kids’ lives.” You will probably see many articles from Common Sense Media in the Parent Feed. In this article, Caroline Knorr, explores how social media and tech companies hook teens and adults with their products.

A Parent’s Guide to 13 Reasons Why. [PDF Resource]

The second season of 13 Reasons Why was release on Friday, May 18 on Netflix. If you are unfamiliar with 13 Reasons Why then here is the recap. In the first season, Hannah Baker makes 13 tapes explaining her reasons for committing suicide. The second season picks up at the beginning of the trial where Hannah’s parents are suing the school for not addressing many of the issues that drove Hannah to her suicide. Topics addressed in the series include bullying, sexting, sexual abuse, cutting, homosexuality, and suicide. The link above connects to PDF resource developed by Focus on the Family to understand and address many of the issues presented in the series.

Should We Monitor Our Kids’ Social Media Use? [Article]

If you are a loving parent seeking to raise healthy children then the answer to this question is YES! In this article, Tim Elmore, shares some statistics, thoughts, and ideas for monitoring kids’ social media use.

Teens Need Summer Jobs to Learn Important Life Skills. Too Bad They’re Not Getting Them. [Article]

This Chicago Tribune article discusses why teenagers are not getting summer jobs and the effect it has on them.

Christian Grandparenting Network. [Blog]

If you are a grandparent reading this article let me commend you on taking an active interested in your grandchildren. If you are a parent, please share this link with your parents. Grandparents today can have a significant spiritual impact on their grandchildren if they will be intentional to do so. This blog (podcast and website) shares thoughts and ideas by grandparents for grandparents to spiritually impact their grandchildren.

King Jesus, Parents, and the Future of Your Children. [Video]

In this video, one of my mentors, Dr. Richard Ross, teaches on the centrality of seeing Jesus Christ in raising children and teenagers who are passionate about Jesus Christ.

Five Minutes in Church History [Podcast]

One of the most helpful things we can do for our kids is to help them see their part in the larger narrative of God’s story of redemption. To do this, we must know the history of how God has worked in the world and through His people in the past. This podcast explores stories of God’s work and His people throughout history in five minute intervals.

Circle. [Web & Device Management]

I get asked often how to filter and monitor the web and devices. Circle was recently recommended to me as a really good one, so if you are looking for a way to filter and monitor your kid’s or teen’s device you might start with Circle.

 

Disclaimer: While I believe each resource can be helpful, I do not necessarily agree with every view expressed by the authors or publishing organizations. I encourage a careful, critical, and biblical examination of each source and the views represented therein.

 

NCC 20 – Who is the Redeemer?

Question

Who is the Redeemer?

Full Answer

The only Redeemer is the Lord Jesus Christ, the eternal Son of God, in whom God became man and bore the penalty for sin himself.

Short Answer

The only Redeemer is the Lord Jesus Christ.

Primary Scripture

For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus. (1 Timothy 2:5)

Commentary

The Only Begotten, Who is before all ages, Who cannot be touched or be perceived, Who is simple, without body, has now put on my body, that is visible and liable to corruption. For what reason? That coming amongst us he may teach us, and teaching, lead us by the hand to the things that men cannot see. For since men believe that the eyes are more trustworthy than the ears, they doubt of that which they do not see, and so He has deigned to show Himself in bodily presence, that He may remove all doubt. . . . The Ancient of days has become an infant. He Who sits upon the sublime and heavenly Throne, now lies in a manger. And He Who cannot be touched, Who is simple, without complexity, and incorporeal, now lies subject to the hands of men. He Who has broken the bonds of sinners, is now bound by an infant’s bands. But He has decreed that ignominy shall become honor, infamy be clothed with glory, and total humiliation the measure of His Goodness. For this He assumed my body, that I may become capable of His Word; taking my flesh, He gives me His spirit; and so He bestowing and I receiving, He prepares for me the treasure of Life. He takes my flesh, to sanctify me; He gives me His Spirit, that He may save me. (Taken from New City Catechism commentary by John Chrysostom, available at http://newcitycatechism.com/new-city-catechism/#20).

Additional Scripture References

  • Matthew 1:21-23. She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet: “Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his
  • Luke 2:11. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.
  • John 1:14. And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth.
  • John 14:6. Jesus said to him, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.
  • Acts 4:12. And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved.”
  • Galatians 3:13. Christ redeemed us from the curse of the law by becoming a curse for us—for it is written, “Cursed is everyone who is hanged on a tree.”
  • 1 Timothy 3:16. Great indeed, we confess, is the mystery of godliness: He was manifested in the flesh, vindicated by the Spirit, seen by angels, proclaimed among the nations, believed on in the world, taken up in glory.
  • Hebrews 7:24-25. But he holds his priesthood permanently, because he continues forever. Consequently, he is able to save to the uttermost those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make intercession for them.

Resources:Catechism Anchor

Teaching Ideas:

  • Read Scripture. Read one or two Scripture passages each day.
  • Create a Flashcard. Write the question on one side of an index card and the answer on the other. Also write the Scripture reference on one side of another index card and the Scripture on the other side. Use these as flash cards throughout the week.
  • Memorize the Question and Answer. Write the question and answer on a whiteboard or piece of paper. Each day erase three or four words and put blanks in their place. Read the question and answer replacing the blanks with the correct missing words.
  • Read the Commentary. Available on the NCC website or App.
  • Define Terms. Look up the definition of redeemer in a dictionary, Bible dictionary, or on-line. Discuss how Christ is the redeemer.
  • Listen to a Song. Listen or read the lyrics to There is a Redeemer.

Discussion Questions

  • Why do we need a redeemer? (review last week’s question & answer)
  • What did Jesus do to redeem humanity?
  • What should our response be to Jesus for redeeming us? What can we do this week to demonstrate our belief and appreciation for Jesus’ redemption?

 

All Scriptures: The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. 2001.
Standard Bible Society: Wheaton.

NCC 19 – Is there any way to escape punishment and be brought back into God’s favor?

Question

Is there any way to escape punishment and be brought back into God’s favor?

Full Answer

Yes, to satisfy his justice, God himself, out of mere mercy, reconciles us to himself and delivers us from sin and from the punishment for sin, by a Redeemer.

Short Answer

Yes, God reconciles us to himself by a Redeemer.

Primary Scripture

Yet it was the will of the Lord to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand. Out of the anguish of his soul he shall see and be satisfied; by his knowledge shall the righteous one, my servant, make many to be accounted righteous, and he shall bear their iniquities. (Isaiah 53:10-11)

Commentary

The second stanza of Martin Luther’s most famous hymn, A Mighty Fortress is Our God, begins, “Did we in our own strength confide, our striving would be losing.” In these words, Luther states the point that no work of any mere human can provide confidence before God. If it were left to humanity to save itself, no person would be able to stand before God with any confidence. Scripture clearly teaches all humanity has sinned and fallen short of the glory of God and that the wages of that sin is death (Romans 3:23, 6:23). Therefore, as a result of sin, all of humanity is guilty before God (Romans 5:12-13). And if left to earn our way back into righteousness before God, the answer to the catechism question would be a resounding “NO!” “But God,” two of the greatest words in Scripture, “shows his love for us in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us (Romans 5:8).” Luther’s hymn continues, “Were not the right Man on our side…Christ Jesus, it is He…And He must win the battle.” Our hope and confidence are not found in ourselves and our works, but rather, the completed work of Jesus Christ on the cross. “For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast (Ephesians 2:8-9).

Additional Scripture References

  • John 3:17. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.
  • Romans 8:3-4. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.
  • 2 Corinthians 5:18-19. All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation.

Resources:Catechism Anchor

Teaching Ideas:

  • Read Scripture. Read one or two Scripture passages each day.
  • Create a Flashcard. Write the question on one side of an index card and the answer on the other. Also write the Scripture reference on one side of another index card and the Scripture on the other side. Use these as flash cards throughout the week.
  • Memorize the Question and Answer. Write the question and answer on a whiteboard or piece of paper. Each day erase three or four words and put blanks in their place. Read the question and answer replacing the blanks with the correct missing words.
  • Read the Commentary. Available on the NCC website or App.
  • Define Terms. Define the terms reconciliation, grace, and mercy. Discuss how these terms relate to the catechism question and answer.
  • Listen to a Song. Listen or read the lyrics to Grace Greater Than All Our Sin.

Discussion Questions

  • Have you ever been in a situation where you thought you would not escape? What was that like? Can you imagine what it would be for us to have no redeemer?
  • How did sin affect our relationship with God?
  • What does the word reconciliation mean? How did God reconcile us to Himself? How does that demonstrate God’s grace? How does that demonstration God’s mercy?

 

All Scriptures: The Holy Bible : English Standard Version. 2001.
Standard Bible Society: Wheaton.